Remodelaholic | How to Make Cornhole Boards from a Pallet

How to Make Kid-Sized Cornhole Boards from a Pallet

At the smaller size (24″ x 32″), I made two cornhole boards out of 1 pallet.

They are perfect for kids just in your backyard, but also for family reunions, birthday parties, and class parties at school. Bonus: they’re easier to store than regulation size!

If you have two pallets, you can make cornhole boards to regulation size (48×24) as set by ACO. Follow the tutorial below, adjusting to the different size as needed. To build legs at regulation height, refer to How to Make Cornhole Boards tutorial.

Supplies to Make Cornhole Boards

Directions for How to Make Cornhole Boards From a Pallet

1.  Measure and cut pallet

Measure and mark your pallet where you will be making your cuts.

My pallet was 32″ x 48″.  Using a jig saw, I cut the pallet into two 32″ x 24″ pieces (as shown below).

2. Measure and cut the 4×4.

Now measure and mark the 4×4 to the width of the pallet.  Since the width of each cut pallet was 24 inches I cut my 4×4 into two 24 inch pieces.  I used a miter saw for these cuts but use what you have.

3. Screw each pallet piece and 4×4 piece together

Place the 4×4 under the cut pallet and screw the bottom pallet boards to the 4×4 (as shown below).

4. Remove sections of boards, if needed.

If there are boards where the scoring hole will be, cut the boards off, leaving the ends in place.  You can see where I did this below.

5. Trace and cut plywood

Turn the “cornhole skeletons” face down onto the plywood.  Trace around the body of each of them and then cut along the traced lines with a jig saw.

6. Nail plywood pieces to each top

Place the cut out plywood onto their respective “cornhole skeletons” and nail it into the top and bottom boards (along where the arrows indicate).

7. Cut molding and attach to left and right sides of each board

Measure and mark the side moldings to the length of the sides of the pallet.  Mine were 32 inches so I cut (4) 32 inch pieces.

Nail the side moldings into the ends of the boards.

8. Cut the hole

Trace around the lid of a standard paint can (or around anything that is 6 inches in diameter) making sure that it is centered to the board.

Then drill a hole in the middle of the circle large enough to fit the jigsaw blade in.  With the jigsaw, cut out the traced circle.  Sand the edge of the circle after it is cut out to prevent scratches or slivers in players’ hands.

9. Sand the boards, fill in the gaps, paint

Sand the cornhole boards as much as you feel is sufficient. I also chose to fill in any gaps between the top plywood board and side boards using spackle and a putty knife.  Then I painted the whole thing white but you can paint or stain it to your heart’s content!

Voila, your cornhole boards are done! I laid a navy blue piece of fabric inside the cornholes for aesthetics and so the players won’t get splinters when they retrieve the bean bags.

Want some fun bags for your small cornhole set?

How to make bean bags for your DIY Cornhole Set:

Typical cornhole games require a total of 8 bags in 2 different colors, but the great thing about DIY is that you can make any number of bags in any colors or patterns you want!

Supplies for making Cornhole Bags:

Directions for making cornhole bags:

1. Cut squares of fabric

For each bag, cut out two 6.5 x 6.5 inch squares of fabric.

2. Place 2 squares together

Lay two squares together with top sides (right sides) facing each other.

3. Sew squares together, leaving gap, and turn right side out.

Note:  For durability, you may want to use a small zig zag sewing stich or double stitch all seams.

Start at one corner and sew together leaving 1/4 inch allowance on the sides.

Leave 2 inches unsewn and turn the fabric right side out by pushing the inside fabric through the 2-inch hole.

4. Fill the bag with dried beans and sew shut

Stick the end of a funnel through the hole in the bag and drop dried beans through the funnel and into the bag.  Fill the bag 90% full then tuck the unfinished edges into the bag and sew the 2-inch hole shut.

And now it’s time to play!

We’ve had a blast with them and hope you do too!

Find more great projects from Provident Home Design here on Remodelaholic such as adding trim above the mantel, a DIY pedestal side table, and a no-fail tutorial to creating your own abstract painting.

Complete the backyard fun with more from Remodelaholic:

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Originally published 06.22.2015 // Updated 03.22.2021

Hello! My name is Tamara and I am the author of Provident Home Design, a blog devoted to deals, DIY, and design. I’m a big advocate for getting “the Look” for less and love to share lots of tips on the subject! Currently i am turning my builder blah home into my own one (or 5 or 6) DIY projects at a time.


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